The GC Blog

Jan 25, 2019

Crushing You Softly: Gentle Giants and Rampagers

For as long as I’ve been in the macrophile worldso that’s pre-electricity, more or lessthere’s been a divide between “gentle giant” and “fuck yeah rampage” types. Occasionally this gets expressed with varying degrees of frustration in tweets, story comments, out-of-character rants, what have you; I’ve seen more of it recently, but it’s a perennial favorite grouse.

The original Giants’ Club tried to split the difference: rampage here, but please don’t rampage there; assume that littles are in danger when they enter the Club, but remember it’s a social space, not a murder den; make sure you have OOC consent for anything extreme you plan to do IC. Toeing the line mostly worked, but there was no way to make everyone happy. Folks closer to either end of the gentle/rampage spectrum felt I was biased against them (and boy, did I hear about it).

Yet despite those who insist this is a bright, hard line, the gentle/rough divide gets pretty permeable in practice. Most people who are fans of rampaging aren’t fans of only rampagingwe give our giant animal-people personalities and romances. Conversely, I know more than a few folks who dislike the rampaging stereotype who nonetheless get awfully interested in pictures of giants crushing cars and knocking over buildings.

For me, this mix is…complicated. I find implacable, inescapable predators pretty sexy, and I joke about planet-eating mice being hot because I think they’re frikkin’ hot. I used to love playing rampaging characters, and I still write about them (hello, vignette mouse). Yet I don’t like meanness and cruelty, and over the years I’ve become increasingly wary of glamorizing it in my stories. Stomping through a city of helpless little people is pretty high up on the “mean and cruel” scale. So…eh?

Let me step back and go fiction instructor at you for a moment, and contrast “villain” with “antagonist.” A villain is, well, villainousthey have evil motives and intent. (They may have what they believe is a noble end in mind, but are willing to commit evil acts to get there.) An antagonist is someone whose goals are in opposition to the protagonist’s. Usually, the antagonist in a story is a villain and the protagonist is a hero, but not always. A villain is a character type; an antagonist is a plot role.

Taking this back around to macrophile topics: are all rampaging giants villains? Well, here’s how I look at it:

The 'Is She a Villain?' flowchart

It’s hard (although not impossible) to make a rampaging giant the hero, but that doesn’t automatically make them a villain. I’d argue sadism is the key differentiator. For the “die before me, you helpless bugs” type of giant, their central thrill isn’t the size, the power, or even the destruction. It’s the death. The people underfoot aren’t collateral damage, they’re the targets.

Now, I’m sure someone reading this feels that this is a facile or unfair reading of sadism. How dare you say Mr. Grey is a villain! But I’m not intending a moral judgement of you, the reader. I’m intending one of the giant. If he’s a sexy, sexy villain that you’re daydreaming of being victimized by, look, I get it. (See: planet-eating mouse fetish.) I’m just saying that doesn’t make him not a villain. Also, Christian Grey is a dick and you know it.

Anyway, I admit that villains usually aren’t too interesting to me. But I have endless love for that “ambiguous” outcome. Miss Flint from “The Perfect Secretary” is one of my relatively rare anti-heroes. Arilin goes from a villain in “Cheating at Solitaire” to a vigilante rampager in “Teacher’s Pet”; the story consciously questions whether you can be a monster for good. And while Sibry from “The Great Game” is the antagonist, there’s never a point where she’s sadistically taunting victims, and what’s going on isn’t what it first appears. She may well be a villain, but she’s a complicated one.

I could go on for a while. Nearly all my giants fall into the “not 100% pure” category; I’ve described Kailani from Goddess as terminally sweet, and she isbut if she thought you were an existential threat to her, her loved ones, or her tribe, God help you. Even Autumn, the goth bunny giantess from the Patreon serial, has wondered what it’s like to swallow someone. She’d never do that to someone who couldn’t come back, but with magic…?

It’s fine to have gentle giants. It’s also fine to have rampagey giants. No matter your preference, your love is valid. For my part, most of my giants will stay camped out somewhere along the spectrum, but not at either end. Gentle, but not always. Rampagers, but not always. Maybe more heroic, maybe more villainous. Complicated. That’s what makes them come alive for me.

Jan 17, 2019

The Giants' Club Blog

I’ve had a “News” section on my web site for a long time, but I don’t use it much, because there’s not an awful lot of news about the site. So I’m changing it to a blog section.

Am I really going to be updating a blog any more than I do a news page? Honestly, I don’t know. But here’s the reasoning: I do have things that I’d like to comment on occasionally, non-fiction things relating to macrophilia, furry, fandom, and even general culture and politics. But these things might not rise to the level of being “essays” on my web site, or at least perhaps shouldn’tI’d rather reserve those for evergreen topics. And Twitter and Mastodon aren’t particularly good for long, organized thoughts in my experience.

The last two essays I wrote, “Furry’s Alive and Well” and “The Sunk Fur Fallacy,” really should have been blog entries, I think. But I didn’t have a blog. Now I do.

Frankly, this is an experiment; it’s possible that I’ll only have something to say annually, which means that I might just be better off making essays after all. But the only way to find out is to try, right?

I should note that the site-building system that I’m using right now doesn’t have comments built in; I can bring back Disqus comments, but you can always just pass along comments and have a discussion by replying to me on Twitter or Mastodon.

Last but not least, the blog has its own RSS feed. (Well, technically an Atom feed, but “RSS” is slightly better known as a concept.) So you can follow along that way if you’d like, too.

Jun 25, 2018

My Patreon

I’ve thought about doing a Patreon off and on for a year, but everything suddenly came together with a story about Arilin’s cousin, Saida, and a new character: Autumn, a rabbit giantess who’s a student of magic at the college. The first chapter of Mensura College: Saida & Autumn will go up on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 at Patreon for free, but future episodes willat least for the time beingbe Patreon-exclusive. (If you can’t or don’t want to support the Patreon, rest assured the stories will be available somewhere else eventually; the tentative plan now is an ebook.)

You can read more about it and, if you’d like, support it here:

Become a Patron!

No matter what you choose, thank you so much for your support over the years! It’s because of readers like you that I have the drive to tell these stories. I literally wouldn’t be here without you! ❤️

Mar 31, 2018

Index shuffling

I’ve (finally) realized that having the main story “table of contents” be ordered alphabetically by title just doesn’t make a lot of sense; people are likely dropping by to see what’s new. So:

And, I’ve also added my newest story, “The Great Game.”

Mar 5, 2018

Supporting me with Ko-fi

Those of you who follow me on Twitter know that I’ve been musing for months on setting up a Patreon. There’s a good chance I’m going to go ahead with that later this year: I’d like to start producing bigger works (no macrophile joke intended) (mostly), and see if I can do some more ambitious serial projects. This absolutely doesn’t mean that I plan to stop writing for freebut getting a bit of income from my giant stories will allow me to sink more time and effort into them!

But, setting up a Patreon is going to be a bit of an ambitious project all on its own for me, and I know not everyone is willing or able to plunk down an ongoing commitment. So, I’ve set up a page on “Ko-fi,” a web site that describes itself as letting fans buy creators a cup of coffee to show their thanks. While Ko-fi allows you to set up recurring payments if you want to, it’s really just setting out a tip jar!

I have other stories in the works, and the serial project I’ve alluded to looks like it might be my longest story everand it’s a sequel to a popular story from early last year involving a rat girl with a crush on her college professor. The new story probably won’t involve said professor (hi!), but…well, you’ll see, I promise.

My personal Ko-fi page is ko-fi.com/arilin. There’s also a button on many pages labeled “Buy me a mai tai” that’ll take you there.

Thanks for your supportand even if you can’t afford to throw a tip my way, thank you all for reading! I wouldn’t have been doing this for this long without all your support and enthusiasm.

Feb 1, 2017

New site

This has taken way longer than I’d expected, naturally, and not all of the functionality is here as of yetbut most of it is, at the least.

Here are the main changes:

Anyway, I hope you like the site! And I’ll try to make sure that it’s not three years between now and the next update.

Jan 15, 2015

Goddess

Russell Rittenhouse knows exactly what he wants: move from his job as a librarian at Bennett University to a professorship. Find a house. Find a wife. The American dream! And the cougar’s fantasies revolving around “Goddess,” a pinup magazine featuring women with the extraordinary gift of size-shifting…well, those are just fantasies.

When Kailani, the beautiful otter princess of a tiny Pacific island, visits Russell’s city of Palo Morado, she becomes an unexpected complication in his plans. Yet she might be the key to them all. If he can sway her to go along with a millionaire’s scheme for a hotel on her island, his professorshiphis whole life planmight be assured! What can possibly go wrong?

Goddess is a great read. It’s got clever writing: romance, legal suspense, action, drama, and an exciting conclusion. Don’t miss it.” Fred Patten, Dogpatch Press

“Worth reading for the adventure and the soft romance. And if you love giant, powerful female furs doing a bit of wrecking ball work, this book is a must-buy.” Greyflank (Goodreads review)

“A simply lovely story of a giant furry nature.” Ramuros (Goodreads review)

Available in print from FurPlanet and DRM-free Kindle and ePub from Bad Dog Books, as well as Amazon (Kindle only).


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